Ferhadija Mosque Reopening: A test of tolerance in a divided city
Twenty-three years to the day since it was demolished by Serbian nationalists as part of an ethnic cleansing campaign, Banja Luka’s grand mosque, Ferhadija, was reopened on 7 May. Despite continuing tensions between the Serbian and Bosniak population of Banja Luka, the ceremony passed off without incident and marked an important date in the city’s troubled history.
Sustainable Return: A Guarantee for Stability and Integration in Bosnia-Herzegovina
This paper analyzes the importance of the return process and sustainable integration of returnees for reconciliation in post-war Bosnia-Herzegovina. With Annex VII of General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia (Dayton Peace Agreement, or DPA), refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) were ensured they could return to their pre-war homes. One obstacle for returnee families is in education – ethnically biased curricula increase divisions between groups.
Pionirska House: Silence and Denial in Višegrad
The Bosnian war ended 20 years ago, but the eastern town of Višegrad still struggles over its collective history. Local authorities wanted to demolish a house on Pionirska Street, where 70 Muslim civilians were burned alive. Protests put the decision on hold, but a permanent solution has yet to be found.
Divided Memoreality: Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo
A visual study of two views and memories of a certain day in 1914.
A New Hope for LGBT in Bosnia-Herzegovina?
Chloé Gaillard speaks with Jasenko, organizer and activist of the 2015 international movie festival Merlinka, about the situation of the Lesbian-Gay-Bi-Trans (LGBT) community in Bosnia-Herzegovina (BiH).
Fighting for Visibility: a Bosnian Coming Out Story
LGBT persons are still subject to stigmatization and discrimination in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Chloé Gaillard speaks with three young Bosnians who agreed to share their personal coming out stories.