Dženeta Karabegović

Dženeta Karabegović

Dženeta Karabegović's wider research interests are rooted in international and comparative politics with a particular focus on trans-nationalism, diaspora, migration, democratization, human rights, transitional justice, and the Balkans. She holds a Ph.D. in Politics and International Studies from the University of Warwick, UK. Her academic work has been published in multiple peer-reviewed academic journals and she is currently working on both article and book-length projects. She is an Assistant Professor at the International Burch University and the Sarajevo School for Science and Technology and works as a Program Consultant for the Post-Conflict Research Center. Previously, she was a Guest Researcher at Mid-Sweden University's Forum for Gender Studies and a Visiting Scholar at the Harriman Institute at Columbia University. She was a U.S. Fulbright Fellow at the Hugo Valentin Centre at Uppsala University in Sweden, holds an M.A. in International Relations from the University of Chicago, and completed her B.A. (Hons) at the University of Vermont in Political Science and German with a Holocaust Studies minor. Dženeta was born in Banja Luka, BiH, grew up in Germany and the United States, has lived in Sweden and England, and has recently returned to Sarajevo, BiH.

Crossing Borders: Showcasing Positive Stories of Migrant Integration into German Society (Part II)
This multi-part series aims to explore various facets of Bosnian migration to Germany and to present the personal accounts of migrants and their children in an effort to not only reflect on the shared experiences of Bosnian migrants but to also consider the wider themes and implications of their stories.
Crossing Borders: An Introduction to Bosnian Migration to Germany (Part I)
"Crossing Borders" is a multi-part series aims to explore various facets of Bosnian migration to Germany and to present the personal accounts of migrants and their children in an effort to not only reflect on the shared experiences of Bosnian migrants but to also consider the wider themes and implications of their stories.