Ferhadija Mosque Reopening: A test of tolerance in a divided city
Twenty-three years to the day since it was demolished by Serbian nationalists as part of an ethnic cleansing campaign, Banja Luka’s grand mosque, Ferhadija, was reopened on 7 May. Despite continuing tensions between the Serbian and Bosniak population of Banja Luka, the ceremony passed off without incident and marked an important date in the city’s troubled history.
450 Years of Jewish Life in Sarajevo
In this week's long read, Mads Jacobsen explores the Jewish experience in Bosnia-Herzegovina through the eyes of Sarajevo-born Rabbi Eliezer Papo.
Endangered History: The Story Behind Sarajevo’s Jewish Cemetery
The dead in Sarajevo’s Jewish cemetery cannot speak for themselves. They cannot protest the damage to which their final resting place has been subjected. David Schafer and Alastair Carr (photos) report.
Cultural Heritage in the Heart of Bosnia
Visoko was once the cradle of Bosnia, a royal town where the coronations of Bosnian rulers occurred. Today, it is a municipality in which culture and anything culture related has died. Lejla Bečar explores the decline of her hometown.
Alcoholism: The Socially Acceptable Disease
Lejla Bečar speaks with young people from Visoko about their views on alcoholism.
The Scars of Transition: Remnants of Humanity in a Heart-Shaped Land
As poet Mak Dizdar describes in “Blue River” there exists a country: “Beyond dread, beyond doubt, beyond nine, beyond ten, deeper and stronger, beyond silence, beyond darkness.” It is here that a good country exists. A country shaped like a heart. That country’s name is Bosnia-Herzegovina and a strange people live in this heart-shaped land.