On Holocaust Memorial Institutions and the Bosnian Genocide
Polish-born Jewish legal theorist Raphael Lemkin first coined the term ‘genocide’ in his 1944 work ‘Axis Rule in Occupied Europe: Laws of Occupation, Analysis of Government, Proposals for Redress.’ Lemkin’s description of genocide as entailing “criminal intent to destroy or to cripple permanently a human group” laid the foundations for the Genocide Convention and genocide studies as a sociological discipline.
An Association Fighting for the Rights of Children with Disabilities
A group of citizens dissatisfied with the rights that their children receive in the area of Herzegovina-Neretva Canton (HNK) founded the association Roditelji djece sa invaliditetom (“Parenting Children with Disabilities”) with the hope of increasing awareness among competent institutions of the issues children with disabilities face.
Finding the “CURE” to Gender Inequality in Bosnia and Herzegovina
The fight for women’s rights in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) has been one of the most difficult human rights issues to overcome in recent years.
Europe’s Double-Standard: Implications of the Disparity of Refugee Policy in Ukraine, Bosnia, and Syria By Natalie Larsen
This prevalence of Islamophobia in Bosnia and in EU refugee policy prompts questions about change and reform, especially given the imminent need to respond to modern conflicts affecting Muslims. 
Platform for the Advancement of Children’s Rights in Bosnia and Herzegovina
Children’s rights are human rights that are not prioritized in Bosnia and Herzegovina. A group of young people and children from all over the country has become actively involved in solving issues related to children’s rights in BiH. The Platform for the Advancement of Children’s Rights is very helpful, as it makes information in this field available. Through the Platform, they can talk to their peers and government representatives and advocate for solutions to various problems.
Covered Women are Just Like Everyone Else
Women who chose to wear a hijab – the headscarf worn by Muslim women as a religious custom – are sometimes subjected to jokes, negative comments, prejudice, and stereotypes. Usually, they simply ignore this. Instead, they focus on professional and social development, proving that women, covered or uncovered, are not just meant to stay at home.